Author: Dirk Riehle

  • Creative practice for dealing with obnoxious reviewers

    Creative practice for dealing with obnoxious reviewers

    Also, I guess for sticking it to somebody else.

  • Some associated editors should grow a spine

    Some associated editors should grow a spine

    There, it happened again. An associate editor of a prestigious software engineering journal rejected our paper, because they wouldn’t overrule a single bogus review. In the current case, all reviewers were on plain accept, with one holdout, reviewer 2, who recommended a plain reject. (The paper was the first revised version of the original submission.)…

  • Editorial quality at Elsevier

    Editorial quality at Elsevier

    If you ever wondered about editorial quality at Elsevier, look no further. Original here and in case it gets fixed, on the Web Archive here, and finally the PDF.

  • Another unintended benefit of chat AIs

    Another unintended benefit of chat AIs

    Professors always hope for crisp, clear, and correct answers from students in response to questions. Often, we get wishy-washy answers that make us despair. This gets particularly bad when asking for a term definition. For example, I might ask: “What is a for loop in computer programming?” hoping for something like “A for loop is…

  • Writing recommendation letters using a chat AI

    Writing recommendation letters using a chat AI

    It is the first week of the new year, and I already got three student requests for recommendation letters. Writing recommendation letters is an important duty of a professor, but writing letters for students who took exactly one course with with me ten years ago is stretching this duty. Thankfully, chat AIs can help–or can…

  • How to extend the authorship list of a research article

    How to extend the authorship list of a research article

    Let’s assume you are a scientist, collaborating with another scientist on some research project that will lead to exactly one article (to keep things simple). How should you go about involving further scientists, perhaps to perform even stronger research? The answer is simple, if you work from first principles. Here there are the two key…